苏州半永久培训

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Woman \’faked father\’s bushfire death\’ Police say the 31-year-old, from Sunshine, claimed a $10,000 compassion and bereavement handout from the Victoria Bushfire Appeal Fund, and $5,000 from Centrelink\’s funeral fund. The Centrelink payment was approved, but the Bushfire Appeal request was turned down after security checks revealed there was no relationship between the woman and the dead man whose name she used. Detectives from the Melbourne Criminal Investigation Unit charged her with attempting to obtain property by deception and obtaining property by deception. The woman was bailed to appear at the Melbourne Magistrates\’ Court on April 14. If convicted, she faces up to 10 years in prison. News of the charges came as Victorian authorities warned “sharks” and “vultures” were trying to cash in on the disaster. Collection tins stolen The state government has condemned property investors who had begun to scout for cheap real estate in fire-ravaged areas, even as bodies were still being recovered. “Overwhelmingly, we\’ve seen the very best of human behaviour over the last couple of weeks but there are a few sharks out there,” said Premier John Brumby. “There are a few vultures who have been trying to get in and snap up cheap property while people are vulnerable,” he added, warning families not to sell in haste. A man was charged earlier this week with stealing collection tins for the fire appeal from hotels in Melbourne, and consumer watchdog Choice has warned against fraudsters. “During the 2003 Canberra bushfires and the 26 December Asian tsunami, scammers took advantage of people\’s generosity and kindness,” it said. “Such scams involve people collecting money by pretending to be a real charity. Not only do these scams cost people money, they also divert much needed donations away from legitimate charities and causes.”

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Fire-safe cigarettes to be fast-tracked The government has moved to fast-track the introduction of “fire safe” cigarettes, following the country\’s deadliest ever wildfires. A discarded cigarette butt has been linked to one of several major blazes that swept through Victoria this month, killing 208 people and leaving another 10,000 homeless. Consumer Affairs Minister Chris Bowen said he would push for the mandatory introduction of self-extinguishing “fire safe” cigarettes – currently slated for 2010 – to be expedited in the wake of the deadly fires. “The minister has requested advice from the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission looking at the possibility of bringing forward the start date,” a spokesman said. A coalition of non-government groups has called for the safer cigarettes to be introduced in time for the next fire season. Fire danger worsening “The tobacco industry has the technology to produce, and is already producing, reduced fire-risk cigarettes in other jurisdictions including Canada and some US states and cities,” said Professor Simon Chapman, from Action on Smoking and Health (ASH). “Clearly the danger of fires is intensifying and we should all do what we can to reduce the risk. “We\’re asking for Australian tobacco manufacturers to show the kind of \’can-do\’ attitude other Australians have shown in the wake of the Victorian disaster.” The cigarettes, which are made with special paper and additives so they go out if left unattended, are compulsory in Canada and some states in the United States. According to ACCC research, approximately seven per cent of fires on public land are started by cigarettes, and eight per cent of all fire-related deaths in Australia between 2000 and 2006 were cigarette-related.

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Anti-gay protesters to picket bushfire memorial Members of a controversial anti-gay church group from the US say they plan to picket outside a memorial service for the victims of the deadly Victorian bushfires. The Westboro Baptist Church is notorious for protesting at the funerals of soldiers killed in Iraq, claiming their deaths are \’punishment\’ for America\’s tolerance of homosexuality. The Kansas-based group, headed by fanatical pastor Fred Phelps, was banned from entering the UK earlier this week – and has now turned its attention to Australia. In a statement, the church said: “The guilty Australians will not repent of their national sins of the flesh – (ie sodomy, divorce, fornication, adultery, etc) – even after God killed hundreds in the fires and cast them into hotter fire and brimstone in Hell. “Therefore we will picket them in their hypocritical grief.” The statement, entitled “God hates Australia. Thank god for fiery deaths of hundreds”, was posted on the group\’s website. National Day of Mourning Thousands of Victorians are expected to gather in Melbourne and a string of bushfire-scorched townships on Sunday as part of a national day of mourning. Victoria\’s recent fire disaster left 208 people dead and thousands more homeless after destroying more than 1,800 houses across the state. Members of the Westboro Baptist Church were barred from the UK on Wednesday, after announcing plans to picket a college performance of The Laramie Project. The play focuses on the 1998 hate-killing of gay man Matthew Shepherd, and the US\’s reaction to his death. Phelps and members of his church protested at Shepherd\’s funeral, bearing placards saying “God Hates Fags” and chanting “Fags die, God laughs”.

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Tamil protesters march to embassies About 300 members of Australia\’s Tamil community have marched on a number of embassies in Canberra demanding an end to hostilities in Sri Lanka and to increase medical aid for civilians. The protesters claim the Sri Lankan government is deliberating bombing Tamil civilians in the north, killing up to 150 people per day. They rallied outside embassies carrying signs reading “Impose sanctions on Sri Lanka”, while a pro-government plane flew overhead trailing a banner stating “Save Sri Lanka from the Tamil Tigers”. United Nations humanitarian chief John Holmes held talks with leaders in Sri Lanka on Thursday over the fate of thousands of civilians trapped in the island nation\’s war zone. The Tamil Tiger rebels stand on the brink of defeat at the hands of government troops after a bloody 37-year campaign for an independent Tamil homeland. The UN has accused the Tigers of shooting civilians who try to escape from rebel-held territory and is pleading with the military to avoid non-combatant casualties. Canberra rally organiser Mahendran Ratnam says the international community must pressure Sri Lanka to agree to a ceasefire and increased medical aid. “Every day for the last three weeks about 100 to 150 innocent people are killed and up to 400 people are severely injured,” Mr Ratnam said outside the German embassy. The government had asked people to gather in “safe areas” and then bombed them, he said. Claims by either side cannot be verified as the government severely restricts independent access to the war zone. “No one knows about this genocide,” Mr Ratnam said. “We are here to take the message to each government. “We want the international agencies to demand a ceasefire, to stop the killings and bombings of civilians.” The protesters marched on the Norwegian, German, Japanese, European Union, Indian and United States embassies. Fellow organiser Sam Pari says peace is only possible if the Tamils are given their own homeland. The international community should impose sanctions on Sri Lanka immediately, she said.

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Bells toll at bushfire memorial service Bells sounded in Melbourne to mark the beginning of a memorial service to remember those who died in Victoria\’s devastating bushfires. Tens of thousands gathered in Melbourne, including hundreds of bushfire survivors, who were shuttled into the city from fire-ravaged towns. The Rod Laver Arena was filled with people, including political leaders, religious leaders, Princess Anne and other dignitaries. Many of those at the service were wearing the distinctive yellow overalls of the firefighters. In a sombre procession, members of the official party including Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, Victorian Premier John Brumby, Governor-General Quentin Bryce and Princess Anne laid flowers at a wreath to remember the dead. Singer Deborah Cheetham led singing of the national anthem. Aboriginal leader Auntie Joy Murphy officially welcomed those to the land of the Wurundjeri people. “The terrible loss of so many human lives, animals and homes is extremely difficult to comprehend and accept, to believe what has happened,” Ms Murphy said. “The spirit of the land will reclaim itself and the bush animals and the pets will return, this is nature\’s way,” she said. Premier John Brumby told those at the service that Australia was a nation deep in mourning. “We are picking up the pieces after the worst natural disaster in Australia\’s history. Devastating fires that have taken family, friends, neighbours and workmates,” Mr Brumby said. “Destructive fires that have torn at the very heart of communities,” he said. Governor-General Quentin Bryce says we\’ll open our hands and reach out to give of ourselves whatever we are able after the unthinkable, the unimaginable, the unspeakable and the unbearable. “We each have our separate tasks, we know what they are and together we know the responsibilities we share,” Ms Bryce said. “In time, what was will be restored – no matter how colossal the effort.” Royal representation Princess Anne represented Queen Elizabeth and the royal family at the memorial. The princess read out a message written by Queen Elizabeth soon after the fires occurred and passed on her condolences. “Although a little daunted, when faced with the scale of loss, and the physical and mental impact that these bushfires have made and are still making for Victoria, individuals and towns have responded with resilience, ingenuity, courage and selflessness to situations that were changing at terrifying speed,” Princes Anne said. She said she would be visiting fire affected areas on Sunday, and speaking to some of those touched by the tragedy. “People from around Australia and across the world watched in horror, but with admiration at their response,” Princess Anne said. “I would particularly thank all those involved in whatever capacity, in the emergency services and in the voluntary organisations,” she said. Kevin Rudd\’s tribute Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said Black Saturday saw the worst of nature but the best of humanity, and vowed that every year on February 7 Australian flags would fly at half mast. “In recent days we have witnessed unspeakable suffering. We have lost mothers and fathers, grandmothers and grandfathers. We have lost brothers and sisters, sons and daughters, the tiniest of children, family and friends and neighbours,” Mr Rudd said. “All these are precious lives. No words can provide solace for grief so personal. But simply know this. You who suffer are not alone. “This great Australian family here assembled and across the nation today is with you.” He said Australia\’s reaction to the bushfires was different to what may have been expected in other places. “In some countries tragedy exposes the faultlines in a nation. The strong abandoning the weak. One region indifferent to the sufferings of another. One culture uncaring as to the needs of another. “But ours is a different nation. Our nation has been as one. Australia, a nation of compassion,” Mr Rudd said. Victoria\’s Governor speaks Victoria\’s Governor David de Kretser said there were no words to encompass the distress of those who had lost loved ones. “These have also been difficult days for all Victorians. Days of fear, of pain and now of haunting sadness,” he said. “It is not only family and friends who have suffered loss. Entire communities have been devastated by these fires.” At least 209 people are known to have died in the February 7 fire storms, most of those from a sweep of towns and villages northeast of Melbourne. Services are being held across Australia to remember the bushfire victims, although the one at the Rod Laver Arena is expected to be the largest.

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Suicide bomber kills 30 at funeral Police say more than 60 people were wounded in the attack, Dera Ismail Khan, a town on the edge of Pakistan\’s restive tribal areas. A curfew was enforced after the blast, which was immediately greeted by intense volleys of gunfire from panicked mourners at the funeral for the late Sher Zaman on Friday, the Muslim weekly day of prayer. The military was ordered to deploy in the town in the North West Frontier Province, which borders neighbouring Afghanistan and is rife with Taliban hardliners and Al-Qaeda extremists, after mobs went on the rampage. Unruly mobs pumped bullets into the air, pelted stones at cars, ransacked shops, torched buses and set up road blocks with burning tyres in the dusty, low-rise town, residents said. Military called in “A curfew has been imposed in the city,” district administration chief Syed Mohsin Shah said. “The military has been called in to support police for restoration of law and order.” The attack came two weeks after 35 people died in a suspected suicide bombing against Shiite worshippers in the central town of Dera Ghazi Khan, in one of the country\’s deadliest sectarian attacks. Around 90 people have been killed in suicide and bomb attacks across Pakistan so far this year – and more than 1,600 since government forces besieged militants holed up in a radical mosque in Islamabad in July 2007. Zaman, the local Shiite activist who was being buried on Friday, was shot dead by unknown gunmen riding on the back of a motorbike in a busy Dera Ismail Khan market on Thursday, a local police official said. He was a prominent member of the Shiite community in the town, who organised community gatherings, police said.

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Bank fears drag down global markets The turmoil also claimed its latest victim with the resignation of Latvian Prime Minister Ivars Godmanis, whose once-buoyant ex-Soviet nation has been badly battered by the crisis along with much of Central and Eastern Europe. US stocks dived at the open of trading, a day after falling to six-year lows, and Europe\’s main indexes plunged by more than three percent, on concerns over the plight of the battered financial sector. “Persistent fears about the health of the assets on banks\’ balance sheets and the uncertainty regarding the future of the nation\’s largest financial firms are weighing on sentiment,” experts at US investment group Charles Schwab & Co said in a report. Short term confidence ‘running out’ CMC Markets dealer Matt Buckland said in London: “Investors are quite simply running out of short-term confidence with equities, especially amongst the banks.” The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 1.11 percent at the open. London\’s FTSE fell 3.23 percent in afternoon trading, while Paris fell 3.74 percent and Frankfurt was down 4.21 percent. Shares in major banks fell on Wall Street and in London. Fresh data meanwhile showed the economic crisis biting ever deeper into Europe with no end in sight, increasing the urgency of a planning meeting on Sunday of the Group of 20 rich and emerging economies. Eurozone continues downward trend Business activity in the 16 eurozone nations hit a record low point in February, according to the zone\’s key purchasing managers\’ index, compiled by data and research group Markit. The eurozone figures were “dire, disappointing and worrying,” said chief European economist at IHS Global insight in London, Howard Archer. The “renewed downward lurch” to record low points “undermines hopes that the rate of contraction in eurozone economic activity could be bottoming out.” The global slump in industrial demand hit London-based mining giant Anglo American, which has big interests in South Africa. It reported a 29-percent drop in 2008 net profit and said it would cut 19,000 jobs this year, blaming a sharp fall in commodity prices. “The breadth and severity of the global economic downturn and its impact on growth rates in key sectors and economies are difficult to overstate,” the company\’s chief executive Cynthia Carroll said in a statement. “From global automotive production to construction activity in emerging markets, there was a marked contrast between the first and second halves of 2008, when commodity prices fell sharply.” Car output in Britain slumped by 60 percent in January on a 12-month basis, trade data showed. And in Sweden, high-class auto maker Saab, a subsidiary of crippled US giant General Motors, filed for protection from bankruptcy. Citigroup analyst Giada Giani said in a note that severe weakness in manufacturing was now spreading to other sectors of the economy. Consumption to fall with employment levels Other data indicated that “labour market conditions are deteriorating very fast” thereby undermining prospects for household consumption. The euro fell sharply to 1.2616 dollars in London from 1.2673 late on Thursday reflecting gathering alarm about the depth of the downturn in Europe. “Things are going from bad to worse in Europe,” strategist Daisuke Uno at Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation said in Tokyo. The New York contract oil price fell 1.68 dollars to 37.80 dollars per barrel in London. In London, the price of gold crept closer to the 1,000-dollar mark, reaching 999.1 dollars an ounce from 980.50 dollars. As the storm of recession cuts ever deeper across Europe, now threatening financial stability in eastern and central Europe, leaders from the main European economic powers are to meet in Berlin on Sunday. They were to aim to forge a common position for a summit of the G20 group of top world economies in London in April.

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Tamil Tigers make bold attack on Colombo At least two people were killed and 44 others wounded when Tamil Tigers smashed a light aircraft into the main tax building of Sri Lanka’s capital. The victims were rushed to the main Colombo National hospital, mostly suffering from shrapnel wounds, hospital director Hector Weerasinghe said. Military officials said one of the light aircraft was shot down near the international airport while the wreckage of the second plane was found inside the bombed Inland Revenue building in the capital, which caught fire. Witnesses said the wreckage was on the 13th floor suggesting that the bomb-laden light aircraft had crashed into the tax office in a kamikaze-style attack. “We have found a blown off arm of the pilot on an upper floor,” an air force officer told reporters at the scene. He said a few pieces of the wreckage were found and they believed the aircraft had been carrying at least two bombs. The Tigers were believed to operate five Czech-built Zlin-143 aircraft smuggled into the island in pieces and re-assembled. The country\’s only international airport was shut down briefly and flights diverted to neighbouring India as rebel planes violated the country\’s airspace, officials said. Rogue aircraft shot down Air force spokesman Janaka Nanayakkara said gunners had brought down one of the light aircraft near the international airport where the military maintains its main air bases. “As one of the Tiger planes was fleeing, it was shot down near Katunayake,” Nanayakkara said, adding that the body of a Tiger pilot had been recovered by troops. Military spokesman Udaya Nanayakkara said the Tigers had bombed the main tax office, which caught fire. Several floors of the building were gutted. The office is located close to a luxury hotel, but there were no reports of foreign nationals among the casualties. Residents in Colombo said they heard blasts shortly after the military ordered a blackout on Friday evening, plunging the capital and its half-a-million inhabitants into darkness as part of the air defence system. Anti-aircraft batteries then began firing into the night sky. Military officials said they had tracked two aircraft of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE), operating out of a narrow strip of land still under their control in the north-east of the island. The military has captured six out of the seven air strips used by rebels, but security forces have — until now — not taken any of their aircraft. Renewed attack on Colombo The last Tiger air strike in the capital was in October 2008 when they bombed a power station, but did not cause any casualties. In September they hit a military base in the north of the island causing considerable damage and killing a dozen security personnel. The latest air strike came as government forces claimed they had destroyed the conventional fighting capability of the Tigers. Troops earlier Friday took another village from the rebels who have lost over 98 percent of the territory they controlled two years earlier. Tens of thousands of people have died since the Tigers launched a campaign in 1972 to carve out a homeland for minority Tamils in the majority Sinhalese island\’s north and east.

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Netanyahu picked to form Israel govt Accepting the nomination from President Shimon Peres on Friday, the former premier named Iran as the main threat to Israel\’s existence and made no direct reference to peace talks with the Palestinians. Netanyahu is pushing for a broad coalition, evidently keen to avert a repeat of the situation in 1999, when his government collapsed following the defection of far-right parties that accused him of making concessions to Palestinians. Livni, the outgoing foreign minister, emerged from talks with Peres saying she would have nothing to do with a right-wing coalition. “I will not be a pawn in a government that would be against our ideals,” she said. Israel needs “a government based on a two-state solution” for Palestinians and Israel, she said. Livni pursued for coalition But Netanyahu did not give up on his hopes and invited Livni for talks on Sunday. “I turn to the Kadima and Labour leaders: let us close ranks and act together,” he said. “I want to meet you first and discuss the formation of a broad government coalition.” Netanyahu did not directly mention Israeli-Palestinian peace talks and made no mention of the US-backed two-state solution, focusing instead on what he said was the threat from Iran. “Iran is seeking to obtain a nuclear weapon and constitutes the gravest threat to our existence since the war of independence,” he said. “The responsibility we face is to achieve security for our country, peace with our neighbours and unity among us.” External reactions Reacting to the nomination, the Palestinian Authority said it would only deal with the new Israeli government if it was committed to the peace process. “We will not deal with the Israeli government unless it accepts a two-state solution and accepts to halt settlements and to respect past accords,” president Mahmud Abbas\’s spokesman Nabil Abu Rudeina said. The United States pledged its support to the incoming government, with State Department spokesman Gordon Duguid saying Washington remained “optimistic” for a solution to the regional peace process. The US also echoed Netanyahu\’s emphasis on Iran, when White House spokesman Robert Gibbs told reporters Tehran\’s suspect nuclear program “is an urgent problem that has to be addressed and we can\’t delay addressing”. The comments came a day after the International Atomic Energy Agency said Iran continued to enrich uranium, a key stage in the atom bomb making process, but had slowed down the expansion of its enrichment activities. Focus on the West Bank Netanyahu believes the time is not ripe to discuss the key issues in Middle East peace talks, including the borders of a proposed Palestinian state, and wants to focus on improving daily life in the Israeli-occupied West Bank. He insists Jerusalem will remain Israel\’s undivided capital. Palestinians want east Jerusalem, which Israel occupied in 1967 and later annexed, to be the capital of their future state. Netanyahu, 59, has also insisted he will not be tied by a recent pledge by outgoing Prime Minister Ehud Olmert to withdraw settlers from the occupied Palestinian territory. As premier from 1996 to 1999, he put the brakes on the peace process, in part by authorising a major expansion of Jewish settlements. But he also made more concessions than his hardline rhetoric had led Israelis to expect, and under US pressure he concluded two agreements with the late Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat. Netanyahu has vowed that if he returns to power he will topple the Hamas rulers of Gaza and put a stop to rocket attacks which have continued sporadically since the January 18 end of Israel\’s 22-day Gaza military offensive that killed more than 1,300 Palestinians. Most capable of forming a coalition While Likud, with 27 of the 120 parliamentary seats, has one seat less than Kadima, Netanyahu emerged as the only one able to rally sufficient support to form a government coalition. Netanyahu can count on the support of 65 of the 120 members of parliament, if he relies on parties to the right of his own despite his stated preference for a broad coalition. He has 28 days to put together a coalition. If necessary Peres can extend the deadline by 14 days.

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